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Logic Plugins Vs Hardware


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#1 Occimoron

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Posted 07 February 2011 - 02:01 AM

I've been taking my Logic Pro mixes to a local studio for final mixes, and the engineer runs the tracks out to his board, then through some outboard compressors and reverb units (all pretty good stuff) in addition to using plugins. I'm thinking of acquiring some effects, like a compressor and reverb unit. Is the $500 +/- hardware (like a dbx 1066 compresssor, or TC Electronics M1 reverb unit) any better than Logic's plugins? The engineer said you gotta spend a few grand to really get any good hardware. Thoughts, opinions, experience anyone?

Thanks
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#2 Occimoron

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Posted 08 February 2011 - 07:12 PM

I'm thinking of acquiring some outboard effects, like a compressor and reverb unit. Is the $500 +/- hardware (like a dbx 1066 compresssor, or TC Electronics M1 reverb unit) any better than Logic's plugins? An engineer friend said you gotta spend a few grand to really get effect units that are really better than plugins. Thoughts, opinions, experience anyone?

Thanks



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#3 pflip

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Posted 21 February 2011 - 05:21 PM

I'm thinking of acquiring some outboard effects, like a compressor and reverb unit. Is the $500 +/- hardware (like a dbx 1066 compresssor, or TC Electronics M1 reverb unit) any better than Logic's plugins? An engineer friend said you gotta spend a few grand to really get effect units that are really better than plugins. Thoughts, opinions, experience anyone?

Thanks


IMHO you're engineer friend is correct

#4 Guest_KittyDa_*

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Posted 23 May 2011 - 04:07 PM

I've been taking my Logic Pro mixes to a local studio for final mixes, and the engineer runs the tracks out to his board, then through some outboard compressors and reverb units (all pretty good stuff) in addition to using plugins. I'm thinking of acquiring some effects, like a compressor and reverb unit. Is the $500 +/- hardware (like a dbx 1066 compresssor, or TC Electronics M1 reverb unit) any better than Logic's plugins? The engineer said you gotta spend a few grand to really get any good hardware. Thoughts, opinions, experience anyone?

Thanks


I also have the same question.

#5 Logic Pro HQ

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Posted 13 June 2011 - 05:04 AM

It really depends on what specifically you are comparing. Each plugin vs. hardware comparison is different and there is pros and cons for each. The important thing to remember is you CAN produce a song and do almost everything within Logic without any hardware.

I think there are definately great things that hardware can add to your sound but I don't think it is a good idea to but hardware for the sake of it. It will not be some magic box that makes your song sound awesome. If there is something you use in logic that you are not happy with, then maybe look at other options.

For example I do not like Logic's Reverbs. So I trailed about 10 other plugins to see which one could reproduce what i was after, luckily I found one. If I hadn't then found a plugin to do the job I would have then moved onto hardware testing as this is usually more expensive, slower and requires space in the studio.

Using this method has always been useful to me. Hope this helps.

#6 Antiphones

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Posted 02 September 2011 - 04:37 AM

IMHO you're engineer friend is correct

I agree, for $500 you are likely to get a unit which is not as good as a decent plugin. Having said that, both TC and dbx are good brands but I'm not familiar with those particular models. I know the TC 6000 which has a great compressor/limiter and reverb but that's about ten times the price range you mention. If you are not happy with Logic's plugins but can't afford high end hardware, I would advise you spend your money on other 3rd party plugins.

Logic's Space designer is an excellent sounding reverb but only if you get the right IRs for it, the IRs logic provides are not that great, there are some great free one's on the internet though... look out for the lexicon, TC, Bricasti and Quantec IRs that are around, they are easy to load into Space Designer. Personally I don't Logic's other reverbs like the platinum etc... are great quality, I wouldn't use them.

I don't think Logic's compressor or limiters are that great either. Wave's make great plugins, they are not cheap but they are a lot cheaper than good hardware. To me they sound just as good as the hardware. They have a big selection to choose from. As a starting point the Renaissance range is excellent.

I think Logic's Linear Phase EQ is pretty good, I use it for some things. Its not going to give you are beautiful musical sheen like some hard ware or high end plugins will, but its good for basic work. For really great sounding EQs that give you that "sheen" or "musical" magic I would again look to Waves or PSP. isotope Ozone is a pretty good all in one "do everything" plugin - better than Logic's EQs and compressors but not quite as good as PSP and Waves. But it all depends on the sort of music you do! Some people swear by Ozone. I like it. But I prefer Waves and PSP.

Hope this helps

#7 JustDan

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Posted 18 November 2011 - 02:15 PM

I'm thinking of acquiring some outboard effects, like a compressor and reverb unit. Is the $500 +/- hardware (like a dbx 1066 compresssor, or TC Electronics M1 reverb unit) any better than Logic's plugins? An engineer friend said you gotta spend a few grand to really get effect units that are really better than plugins. Thoughts, opinions, experience anyone?

Thanks


It really depends on the hardware unit and if you like how it sounds. Hardware units have some level of imperfection that makes them interesting and often beautiful, which gives them their appeal and value. What is "better" is an artistic question and based upon the sound you wish to achieve. If you become very expert at the plug-ins, you may also be able to find a combination of plug-ins and settings that give you a signature sound you'll fall in love with as well.
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#8 Peter Jakab

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Posted 25 November 2011 - 01:37 AM

Hello there,

How do you reckon software plugins for say compression and EQ compare
to their hardware counterparts?
Can anyone hear that EQ is done in software?
Are some software EQ's better than others?

I was thinking of getting a hardware EQ, is there any point?



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#9 JustDan

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Posted 30 November 2011 - 06:19 PM

External hardware used to overcome the limitations of the processing power of DAWs, but because DAWs are so powerful now, that reason has diminished. Now, it is largely a matter of personal taste: does the hardware have some sort of imperfection to it that you really like the sound of? I love a really clean sound, so I stick with plug-ins, but that is just a personal choice. The decision really hinges on the kind of sound you want to make.
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#10 angelonyc

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Posted 14 November 2015 - 09:44 PM

I've gone the route of using hardware instruments, totally virtual, now I'm going back to getting some hardware again..  It just 'FEELS GOOD' to move a knob and get audible satisfaction... I'm over moving the mouse 1/32 of an inch to accomplish something... To me, several pieces of hardware synths sound more 'alive' than virtual instrument plug-ins. 

 

I do use a mixture of both.. The effects processing is another factor though. Some of the 3rd party processing effects are great.. I like Slate Digital, Isotope, Guitar Rig. Several other limiters, compressors.. I've never felt much affinity with Logic's effects, plug-ins, although some people do great stuff with them (just my own taste I guess).   

 

Having all or most of it in software is NICE.  Years ago, I worked for a label, and we went to a real 'mastering studio every month..  But software technology has come quite a LONG way since then..  The true test is what sounds good to you..  If you think it sounds better to you, one way or the other, it does..   

 

I used to get carried away putting plug-ins on things cause I could, than I began to realize sometimes the song really sounded better without that limiter, compressor, etc.  Of course there are times when you have too.. The key ultimately boils down to a great arrangement. knowing what ranges and where to play for each instrument.. That goes a lot further, than jacking everything up with plug-ins.. Then you can sometimes end up with a 'hot mess'...






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